Whether you want to bring candy with you on your next flight or are thinking of bringing some back with you from your vacation, you’re probably wondering if you’ll be okay.

After all, there is so much delicious candy around the world, and who doesn’t love a snack on a long flight.

The good news is that you can bring candy on a plane in both your carry on and checked bags.

But there are a few things to be aware of depending on if the candy is solid, a liquid, or gel; international flight rules, and if you can also eat candy on a plane.

Can You Bring Candy on a Plane?

Checked Bags

You can pack all types of candy, including solid, gel, liquid, and powdered candy, in your checked bags.

There is technically no limit to how much candy you can bring with you, with the only limitation being meeting airlines’ weight and size baggage restrictions.

Carry on Bags

You can bring candy on a plane in your carry on bags, but the TSA’s 3-1-1 rule applies.

This rule states that you are only allowed to bring liquids, gels and aerosols in your carry on bags if they do not exceed 3.4oz/100ml.

One thing to note is that TSA officers may require you to separate foods and powders when going through airport security.

So while you’ll be fine to pack most candy in your carry on bags, there are a few notable exceptions, which we will cover below.

Domestic vs. International Flights

Regardless if you’re flying domestically within the USA or internationally, you will have no problem bringing candy on a plane.

Again, you will not be permitted to bring liquid or gel candy that exceeds 3.4oz/100ml in your carry on bags, as this rules applies worldwide.

By Airline

It doesn’t matter if you’re flying with Southwest, United, Delta, American Airlines, or any other major or regional international or domestic carrier.

You will be able to bring candy on a plane in both your checked and carry on bags, but again, liquid and gel candy must not exceed 3.4oz/100ml.

Type of Candy

  • Sealed Candy: You can bring sealed candy in both your carry on and checked bags.
  • Open Candy: You can bring open candy in both your carry on and checked bags.
  • Hard Candy: You can bring hard candy in both your carry on and checked bags.
  • Cotton Candy: You can bring cotton candy in both your carry on and checked bags.
  • Gummy Bears: Gummy bears may be made from gelatin, but you can bring them in both your checked and carry on bags without any restrictions.
  • Liquid Candy: Liquid candy, like squeeze pops, are permitted in your checked bags in any quantity, but only permitted in your carry on bags if the container does not exceed 3.4 oz/100ml.
  • Gel Candy: As mentioned, gummy bears can be packed in both your checked and carry on bags without any restrictions. Some candies are available in gel or paste form in tubes or bottles, but these are not allowed in your carry on bags if the container exceeds 3.4oz/100ml.

Can You Eat Candy on a Plane?

If you want to bring candy on a plane and eat it during your flight, you will have no problem doing so.

Is There a Limit to How Much Candy You Can Bring on a Plane?

There is technically no limit to how much candy you can bring on a plane in your checked bags, as long as you do not exceed the airline’s weight and size restrictions for baggage.

If the candy is in liquid or gel form, the container must be no larger than 3.4oz/100ml if you want to pack it in your checked bags.

Can You Bring Chocolate on a Plane?

If you want to bring chocolate on a plane in either your checked or carry on bags, you will have no problem doing so.

However, keep in mind that chocolate spreads like Nutella are considered a liquid, so they must not exceed 3.4oz/100ml if you want to pack it into your checked bags.

The same applies to other food items like jams, jellies, honey and syrup.

Cream/gel/liquid filled chocolate are fine to bring in both your checked and carry on bags.

Can You Bring Pies and Cakes on a Plane?

The TSA state that you can bring pies and cakes on a plane in both your checked and carry on bags.

No pies or cakes are considered a liquid, so the TSA’s 3-1-1 rule does not apply.

See Also: